Maremma

The towers and tunnels of the Archaeological Mines Park of San Silvestro

A voyage to the bowels of the mountain finding out about the miners’ life and the Val di Cornia. The Archaeological Mines Park of San Silvestro stands in the very…

A voyage to the bowels of the mountain finding out about the miners’ life and the Val di Cornia.

The Archaeological Mines Park of San Silvestro stands in the very heart of the Livorno Maremma area next to the enchanting medieval village of Campiglia Marittima, Tuscany.

Stretching over around 450 hectares, it is a protected natural area contained within the Val di Cornia parks, which aims to preserve and promote the Rocca San Silvestro medieval castle, mines and the memory of the hard work of the miners – all within beautiful natural scenery of wide views all the way to the coast.

Il centro visite del Parco archeominerario di San Silvestro.

Il centro visite del Parco archeominerario di San Silvestro.

The park experience starts with a visit to the Museum of Archaeology and Minerals, continuing with a guided tour of the Temperino Mine and finally reaching the Pozzo Earle where you can find the Museum of Mineral Machinery and the Miners’ Museum.

From here we embark on a true underground voyage to the centre of the Earth; accompanied by our guide and comfortably seated on a yellow train – very popular with the kids – we enter the Lanzi-Temperino Tunnel, dug by miners in ancient times. During the 20-minute long trip, we find ourselves lost in the geological and mineral history of the place, also immersed in the histories of those who lived and worked in the darkness of these tunnels.

All’interno della galleria.

All’interno della galleria.

Leaving the mountain, we reach the valley where we can find the ruins of the Rocca di San Silvestro castle after a quick walk from the railway station.
The castle is a fortification built around 1000 AD using the mineral deposits in which the area was rich and for which it was renowned even in Etruscan times. It stands around 330 metres above sea level on Mount Rombolo and is a panoramic point looking over the surrounding valleys, the San Vincenzo Tower and Rocca di Campiglia. Located strategically, the three towers were part of the wider defensive network of the Val di Cornia.

La Rocca di San Silvestro.

La Rocca di San Silvestro.

Our visit can continue to Campiglia Marittima, Tuscany, where the Museo della Rocca in the very Rocca di Campiglia complex tells us the history of the village and legendary tales of medieval knights and aristocrats.

The visit is enriched by walks in the fascinating alleys of the historical centre, pausing to enjoy genuine dishes in one of the restaurants in Piazza della Repubblica, or you can choose to travel along the Etruscan Coast Wine Road: this area is where the prestigious DOC VAL di Cornia comes to life: in this splendid countryside vineyards and olive groves reign scattered with farms and agricultural producers of typical products and local extra-virgin olive oil.

What to see and do in the Archaeological Mines Park of San Silvestro and the surrounding area:

  • Rocca di San Silvestro.
  • Museum of Mineral Machinery and the Miners’ Museum.
  • Museum of Archaeology and Minerals.
  • Temperino Mine.
  • Lanzi-Temperino Tunnel.
  • Campiglia Marittima village and fortress.

Archaeological Mines Park of San Silvestro

Opening times vary depending on the time of year and can be consulted here

How to get here:

 

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Sorano and the San Rocco archaeological area

Known as the Matera of Tuscany, the tufa city of Sorano is a treasure chest of history and nature. Rising on a cliff of tufa rock overlooking the narrow valleys below, the…

Known as the Matera of Tuscany, the tufa city of Sorano is a treasure chest of history and nature.

Rising on a cliff of tufa rock overlooking the narrow valleys below, the village of Sorano (Tuscany, Italy) was founded in medieval times as a fief of the noble Aldobrandeschi family, but the territory tells a story that dates back to much further. It was inhabited as long ago as Etruscan times as shown by the many settlements, excavated roads and necropolises found in the area.  

Sorano is located in the so-called Area del Tufo, this splendid part to the south east of the Grosseto Maremma area bordered to the north by Mount Amiata and to the south by the Lazio region, characterised by the presence of tufa rock which is very easy to work and light. Together with Sovana and Pitigliano they make up the three famous Città del Tufo (Tufa Cities). 

Il borgo di Sorano

Il borgo di Sorano

The hilltop village winds along picturesque alleys, homes and handicraft shops, overlooked by the stately Masso Leopoldino; you can enjoy a beautiful view over the village and the surrounding nature from the terrace of this ancient fortified structure which, together with the 14th century Fortezza Orsini, represented Sorano’s main defence system.  

An extraordinary example of military architecture, you cannot miss the chance to visit the Fortezza Orsini, home to the interesting Museum of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and a series of underground ramparts discovering the labyrinth that runs below the village.  

Il Ponte della Fortezza Orsini

Il Ponte della Fortezza Orsini

The area outside of Sorano is full of sites of important archaeological, historical and natural value; the Città del Tufo Archaeological Park has opened them to the public and stretches out to the adjacent areas of Sovana and San Quirico, where you can find the “lost city” of Vitozza.  

Just a few minutes by car from Sovano’s historical city centre, you can find the rocky settlement of San Rocco, which is open to the public for free.  Named after a small chapel dedicated to the saint, the area also features a natural terrace with a spectacular view over the village of Sorano. Immersed in the greenery, it is the departure point for trekking itineraries: from here you can go off to discover flourishing nature, primitive caves, tombs half-hidden in the plants and the impressive excavated roads  part of the ancient Etruscan communication network dug into the tufa and characterised by the steep walls on the side of the road that can reach up to 20 metres in height.  

The route following the San Rocco excavated road starts just behind the San Rocco church, descends to the River Lente valley and in around twenty minutes leads to the ancient entrance to Sorano – the Porta dei Merli, at the very foot of the Masso Leopoldino. 

Via cava di San Rocco

Via cava di San Rocco

With walks among the most fascinating parts of history and excellent places to eat in the historical centre, Sorano also offers moments of pure relaxation. Just four kilometres south of the village you can find hot springs that have been used since ancient times: the Terme di Sorano can be enjoyed in a very pleasant spa and are part of a wider thermal waters context made famous by the nearby hot springs of Saturnia

What to see in Sorano, Tuscany (Italy):

  • The medieval city centre and its fascinating alleys. 
  • The Masso Leopoldino. 
  • The Fortezza Orsini. 
  • The Museum of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. 
  • The view and rocky settlement of San Rocco. 
  • The San Rocco excavated road and the Lente valley. 
  • The Terme di Sorano hot springs. 

Parco Archeologico Città del Tufo

Sorano

How to reach:

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Things to do and see in Saturnia and Montemerano

More than just thermal baths; a weekend of history, good food and, above all, relaxation in Maremma, Tuscany. The name Saturnia immediately inspires thoughts of pleasant days of peace and…

More than just thermal baths; a weekend of history, good food and, above all, relaxation in Maremma, Tuscany.

The name Saturnia immediately inspires thoughts of pleasant days of peace and good food, immersed in the hot waters of the springs. But as well as the soothing heat of the baths, the area also offers another type of wellbeing to be experienced in Italy.

Nearby are villages of certain charm, custodians of a long-ago history that has remained surprisingly intact. The villages of Saturnia and Montemerano, in the municipality of Manciano, are just a short car journey from the Saturnia Thermal Baths and are definitely worth a visit to experience another kind of pleasure through their history and genuine flavours.

Le cascate del Mulino

Le cascate del Mulino

The village of Saturnia was first mentioned in a document dating back to around 1200 AD and referring to the castle, the church of Santa Maria Maddalena and the already very popular hot springs. It was first the property of the Aldobrandeschi family, passing subsequently to that of the Orsini family; the same fate as that of the nearby villages known as the Città del Tufo (Tufa Cities): Pitigliano, Sorano and Sovana. Similarly, the first settlements date back to the Etruscan era, as shown by the archaeological findings discovered in the area, some of which are kept in the Museum of Archaeology of Saturnia – Manciano – The Albegna hills. Testaments of the village’s history also include the fortified structure of the Rocca Aldobrandesca and Porta Romana: the oldest part of the town walls dating back to Roman times where the ancient Via Clodia passes.

Art and history are fused in Saturnia: as well as being full of bars and restaurants, the heart of the centre, represented by Piazza Vittorio Veneto, is also home to the Pietro Aldi Cultural Centre, a collection of works by the well-known Manciano-born painter as well as a children’s library.

Il polo culturale Pietro Aldi

Il polo culturale Pietro Aldi

Montemerano has an even more characteristic air; listed as one of the Borghi più Belli d’Italia (Most Beautiful Villages in Italy), its historical centre has been kept exactly as it was in medieval times.

A scene of narrow alleyways, ancient buildings and stone houses which catapult visitors to a whole new era as they simply wander the streets. And as you wander the village, make sure you take in the splendid view from the Piazza del Castello over the Church of San Giorgio and the History of Art Library where around ten thousand books wait to be read; all this without, of course, forgetting a break for fine wine and food in one of the elegant restaurants that line the squares and alleys of the village.

La piazza del castello di Montemerano

La piazza del castello di Montemerano

And at the end of our experiences with history and good food, the Saturnia Hot Springs have just what you need to rest and relax. You can choose to pervade the senses in the beneficial sulphurous waters in the splendid spa or in the open springs of the Cascate del Mulino, immersing yourself not only in the baths but also in the nature of the Maremma. Waterfalls and pools formed naturally by the incessant flow of the thermal waters create a truly unique landscape for leisure and relaxation that are equally unique.

Il caratteristico centro storico di Montemerano

Il caratteristico centro storico di Montemerano

Things to do and see in Saturnia and Montemerano:

  • The town centre and Piazza Vittorio Veneto in Saturnia,
  • The Museum of Archaeology of Saturnia – Manciano – The Albegna Hills,
  • The Pietro Aldi Cultural Centre,
  • The Rocca Aldobrandesca,
  • Porta Romana and Via Clodia.
  • The medieval village, alleyways and Piazza del Castello in Montemerano,
  • The Church of San Giorgio
  • The History of Art Library.
  • Saturnia Thermal Baths,
  • The free hot springs of Cascate del Mulino.

Info:

SPA Terme di Saturnia

Terme libere Cascate del Mulino

Montemerano

How to get here:

 

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Montemassi, the Castle that dominates the Maremma

A thousand-year old castle, stories of battles and war commanders, villages nestled in the rock and Tuscan wines: an itinerary in the Colline Metallifere.  For almost one thousand years the Castello di Montemassi has watched over its…

A thousand-year old castle, stories of battles and war commanders, villages nestled in the rock and Tuscan wines: an itinerary in the Colline Metallifere. 

For almost one thousand years the Castello di Montemassi has watched over its lands: that part of the Maremma that surrounds it stretching out to the foot of the Colline Metallifere. 

A visit to the building doesn’t just mean walking around the ruins; above all, it will take you to the very top of the tower where you can admire an incredible 360° view over the hills below: a valley that surrounds the fort in every direction.  

Montemassi

Montemassi

Easily reached from the coast and Grosseto, the first document mentioning the castle dates back to 1076, but its fame is inextricably linked to a work of art narrating subsequent events: the renowned Guidoriccio da Fogliano attributed to the master Simone Martini. 

Today held in the Palazzo Pubblico in Siena, this large fresco portrays Guidoriccio da Fogliano at the siege of Montemassi – he can be seen in the centre. To the left of the commander you can see Montemassi in the distance, its tower still intact and almost alive, surrounded by the walls and ready to repel the enemy; to the right is the Siennese camp, the very front of the offensive with its tents and its vines.

Yes, vines, as absurd as it sounds: in fact, a probable translation error in the war chronicles led the artist to paint vines instead of vinae which were wartime weapons. After all, vines in Tuscany are never out of place – even in works of art 

Gli stretti vicoli nascondono piccole sorprese

Gli stretti vicoli nascondono piccole sorprese

Walking along the castle’s stone ramparts to the very top of the tower you can immerse yourself in the landscape of the painting and even hear the echoes of the many battles fought here. Your walk may continue along the streets of the village, stopping to eat in a restaurant perhaps. But the surrounding nature brings with it a pervading idea of peace, inviting visitors to enjoy the view and a relaxing holiday. A few minutes north of the Castello di Montemassi you reach Roccatederighi, 

Grosseto. This village nestles in the volcanic rock of the Colline Metalliferein which man has expertly carved out homes, alleys and stairways into the surrounding stone over the years. At sunset, the village is tinted pink and orange, making it and the nearby woodland even more enchanting. 

If, on the other hand, you are following your palate looking for Tuscan food and wines (such as the Sassabruna Rocca di Montemassi), head south from the Castle to the Rocca di Montemassi wine-making company and estate, found in a part of the Maremma cultivated for wine production as far back as Etruscan times.  

La torre del castello

La torre del castello

The Castello di Montemassi is open all year round and can also be visited at night. 

 Al Castello, restaurant in the village of Montemassi. 

Tenuta Rocca di Montemassi

How to get here 

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San Galgano and Montesiepi: the real sword in the stone

San Galgano: following in the footsteps of the knight who thrust his sword into the stone. A brief excursion into the history and legends of Tuscany A simple yet enchanting…

San Galgano: following in the footsteps of the knight who thrust his sword into the stone. A brief excursion into the history and legends of Tuscany

A simple yet enchanting and mysterious itinerary starts with a brief walk from the Abbazia di San Galgano to the Eremo di Montesiepi, where you can find a real 900-year old sword in the stone.

il sentiero per arrivare all'Abbazia

Il sentiero per arrivare all’Abbazia

This is a truly special area, certainly worth a half-day trip. Leaving your car in the free car park nearby, the looped walk starts from the Abbey and follows a country road and a cypress-lined avenue up to a unique building.

The (long de consecrated) church acts as a bridge between land and sky: now with neither roof nor floor it seems to have risen forever like this in this particular place, silently telling its story and emanating an aura of magic that is difficult to ignore.

Even children are transported by the enchantment of this Abbey, playing hide-and-seek amongst the ancient columns.

Osservare il cielo attraverso il rosone.

Osservare il cielo attraverso il rosone.

The tranquil surrounding countryside invites you to wander around the building, taking time to look around; you cannot miss the building that is slightly higher up and not far from where you stand. A sign marks a pathway that leads to the Eremo di Montesiepi. A brief trek of no more than 15 minutes, and what you’ll find at the end is more than worth it.

L’Eremo di Montesiepi e la Rotonda

L’Eremo di Montesiepi e la Rotonda

The Chapel (or Rotunda) is free to enter and conserves a unique, historically-worthy attraction – and truly the stuff of legends: now under glass to preserve it from atmospheric agents, this sword trapped in the stone seems to be awaiting the return of King Arthur.

A Made in Tuscany Excalibur; there are even those who believe that this sword – authentic and dating back to the first half of the 12th century – was the very one to inspire the Arthurian legend.

But who did it belong to? Galgano Guidotti, born in the nearby village of Chiusdino, was a dissolute knight who, after a vision of Saint Michael, abandoned all his worldly goods and thrust his sword into the land, with the intention of never using it again. The sword in the stone was never touched again and today the chapel stands on the very site of his home

L’autentica spada nella roccia

L’autentica spada nella roccia

To complete the itinerary, you can get in your car – closing the loop – and in a few minutes you are in Chiusdino, where you can see the relics of the saint, including a rock showing the marks made by Galgano’s horse when it fell to its knees in front of the vision of Saint Michael.

A fact that not many are aware of: just a few minutes by car from the Abbey and Chiusdino you can find the Mulino delle Pile water mill, or rather the original Mulino Bianco! Today used as a farm holiday home, you can stop for a quick selfie in front of the most famous water mill in Italy, and maybe even the world.

Abbazia di San Galgano:

open every day, times change depending on season

  • from NOVEMBER to MARCH: 9am – 5:30pm
  • APRIL, MAY and OCTOBER: 9am – 6pm
  • JUNE and SEPTEMBER: 9am – 7pm
  • JULY and AUGUST: 9am – 8pm

Tickets cost €4.00 full price and €3.00 reduced (under-18s, over-65s, students, groups of more than 20 people or families with at least four members). For info: +39 0577 756738

Eremo di Montesiepi:

open every day from 9am to sunset; for info +39 0577 756700

How to get here from PuntAla Camp & Resort

some photos

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The marvels of the Giardino dei Tarocchi: somewhere between dream and reality

A park of brightly-coloured exoteric statues immersed in the enchantment of the lower Grosseto Maremma area just 10 minutes from the seas of Capalbio.  Anyone who has visited and fallen in love with Gaudì’s Parque Guell in Barcelona or the more…

A park of brightly-coloured exoteric statues immersed in the enchantment of the lower Grosseto Maremma area just 10 minutes from the seas of Capalbio. 

Anyone who has visited and fallen in love with Gaudì’s Parque Guell in Barcelona or the more local Parco dei Mostri in Bomarzo will be pleased to hear that there is another park, in Tuscany: lost in the infinite horizon of the lower Tuscan Maremma area, the Giardino dei Tarocchi glows with its statues, mirrors and mosaics.  

Conceived from Niki de Saint Phalle’s seemingly impossible dreamthe Garden is a hugely successful tourist destination suitable for adults and children alike. But beware: it is only open half days from April to October.  

Alcune delle sculture al suo interno

Alcune delle sculture al suo interno

There are twenty-two large statues hiding in the park’s dense vegetation, all inspired by the figures of the Major Arcana of tarot cards. Some, such as the High Priestess and the Magician, rise unshyly from the main square; you can catch glimpses of others as you wander further into the two striking hectares of land that act as a backdrop to the scene. Others are set up as dwellings for the builders involved in the project  including Niki herself, obviously.

They are made of steel and cement and covered in glassmirrors and coloured ceramicsEach visit is pervaded by a sense of absolute enchantment, mystery and esotericism.  

Le sculture

Le sculture

Niki dedicated all her energy to the Garden. Building started in 1977, and continued for more than seventeen years. Many worked together to make its construction possible, including employees, a team of famous artists and enthusiastic citizens.  

La forza

La forza

In 1997, Niki de Saint Phalle established the Il Giardino dei Tarocchi Foundation with the aim of preserving and maintaining her own work. On 15th May 1998, the Giardino dei Tarocchi was opened to the public; however, as you wander the park you will notice that some works have not been terminated and, in fact, one statue remains incomplete: work stopped upon the artist’s death in 2002. One of her most curious wishes was to completely prohibit guided tours of the park, leaving the garden open to the free interpretation of its visitors.  

Undoubtedly the best way to reflect on the sculptures and their mysteries is while sipping a glass of good Tuscan wine on a terrace in Capalbio while admiring the sunset, the colourful houses and the horizon, taking a piece of the magic of the garden and making it one’s own. 

Una vista panoramica dal paese di Capalbio

Una vista panoramica dal paese di Capalbio

Opening times 

From 1st April to 15th October, Mon-Sun from 2:30pm to 7:30pm 

Entrance fee 

Full ticket € 12.00  Reduced € 7.00 

Free entrance to children under seven and people with disabilities 

Interactive map

How to reach

some photos

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Walks in time: the archaeological enchantment of Roselle

Roselle: walks in an archaeological site unknown to most. A dip into the past just 20 minutes from the sea of Castiglione della Pescaia. “A wilderness of rocks and thickets —…

Roselle: walks in an archaeological site unknown to most. A dip into the past just 20 minutes from the sea of Castiglione della Pescaia.

“A wilderness of rocks and thickets — the haunt of the fox and wild boar, of the serpent and lizard — visited by none but the herdsman or shepherd…” George Dennis, the 19th-century British diplomat and scholar, thus described the little town of Roselle while visiting the Maremma area.

Roselle is still a place of wild, timeless enchantment enriched by the historical interest of the nearby Archaeological Area (MiBAC). Managed by the Polo Museale della Toscana, the site is easy to reach, just a few kilometres from Grosseto along the state road to Siena.

Roselle, Archaeological Area

Roselle, Archaeological Area

The path winds through the park for around two kilometres revealing the remains of civilisations that have roamed these lands from Prehistoric times: the tours guided by experts of the area and the excursions available should be on the bucket list of any archaeological lover. The traces of settled civilisations date back to the 7th century BC: the hills of Roselle and Vetulonia dominated the valley from a strategic position, where the presence of the River Ombrone was an opportunity for trade with the Val d’Orcia and the hinterland of Etruria.

Roselle, area archeologica

Roselle, area archeologica

From its high position, Roselle has born witness to many important changes. Where the valley now extends out, once there were waters and lagoons: Lake Prile today is just a memory; subject to drainage works, merely a reflection of the waters remains in the memory of Roselle.

L'area archeologica vista dall'alto

L’area archeologica vista dall’alto

Yet there are many traces of an even more remote past: the main museum complex and the terrace walls that can be walked along are tangible signs of when the area was one of the most important Etruscan cities. Wandering along the top of these ancient constructions, our view extends over the countryside and the panorama: a gift for visitors who find themselves suddenly transported back in time and history, far from today’s frenetic world under a sky that seems to still belong to times gone by.

Roselle, area archeologica

Roselle, area archeologica

Colonised in Imperial times, the Romans left an important legacy to Roselle: in fact, the oldest thermal baths complex in the Maremma area can be found right here. But the Medieval period marked a moment of abandonment. The Diocese was moved to Grosseto, and Roselle was transformed, day by day, into the archaeological site that it is today.

Particolare di una pavimentazione

Particolare di una pavimentazione

At the end of your walk through time and nature, you can spend a pleasant evening in the nearby Cava di Roselle; this abandoned quarry is home to a beautiful garden that hosts parties and events – from the terrace you can enjoy a breath-taking view over the Maremma area.

Archaeological area 

Open daily following each season schedule. For information: 0564-402403 / +39 335-1450361

Cava di Roselle

For information: +39 348-4800409 / info@cavaroselle.net

Where to sleep

Puntala Camp & Resort

How to reach

 

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Mines Of Gavorrano

The Maremma although now a beautiful location for nature and beaches, was once a very important area for mineral extraction and related activities. Going back to pre-Roman times, minerals have been…

The Maremma although now a beautiful location for nature and beaches, was once a very important area for mineral extraction and related activities. Going back to pre-Roman times, minerals have been a fundamental part of the area. The current mine shafts are not all accessible but extend up to 300 meters beneath the surface, an impressive feat of engineering that we explored for the afternoon. To try and understand how important it we visited the Museum of mining in Gavorrano which is an ideal family activity to do in the area. The visitor center contained lots of things interesting for all age groups.

IM2_0788

IM2_0789

Inside the Visitor Center

Inside the visitor center the guides will take you on a brief tour of what can be seen in the area before entering the museum complex.

Fabrizio - head of the geological tourism elements of the park explains the various interconnections and history of mineral extraction in the area.

Fabrizio – head of the geological tourism elements of the park explains the various interconnections and history of mineral extraction in the area.

The visitors centre contains a range of displays that show some key elements of the mining activities that took place in Gavorano.

The visitors center contains a range of displays that show some key elements of the mining activities that took place in Gavorrano.

Museum

Outside the museum and mine entrance Visitors will find a range of things on display that were actually used when the mine was active.

In modern times compressed air driven machinary was used in the mineral extraction process.

In modern times compressed air driven machinery was used in the mineral extraction process.

The entrance to the mine is within the museum and lies under the cone display area.

The entrance to the mine is within the museum and lies under the cone display area.

A plaque commemerating miners who lost their lives around the time of the Nazi occupation of Italy.

A plaque commemorating miners who lost their lives around the time of the Nazi occupation of Italy.

Outside the museum there are a selection of machines used in the mining process. This machine was for creating stabilising cement.

Outside the museum there is a selection of machines used in the mining process. This machine was for creating stabilising cement.

Inside The Museum

Inside the
museum, the curators have gathered together a range of minerals and other objects that help explain the significance of the mining activities and why Gavorrano was so important. This includes displays of minerals and materials which people can get a hands-on with and learn about the rocks of the Maremma.

The museum contains a mineral collection that is on display and are examples of the minerals found undergraound in the area.

The museum contains a mineral collection that is on display and are examples of the minerals found underground in the area.

A large piece of Pyryte is on display.

A large piece of Pyryte is on display.

Pyryte has a gold lustre to it, and was used significantly for sulphuric acid production before oil superseeded it. Notice the cyrstalisation on the mineral.

Pyrite has a gold luster to it, and was used significantly for sulphuric acid production before oil superseded it. Notice the crystallization on the mineral.

The entrance to the mine contains plans showing the layout of the mine complex.

The entrance to the mine contains plans showing the layout of the mine complex

The overhead view of the mine complex shows how long the tunnels are and how they connect between the villages.

The overhead view of the mine complex shows how long the tunnels are and how they connect the villages

The display area before entering a mine.

The display area before entering a mine.

 

Entering The Mine

Following the instructions of the staff, we entered the mine which has been prepared to give visitors an immersive experience about what they might find underground in a real working mine.

The mine entrance.

The mine entrance.

Inside the mine visitors will find examples of how the miners worked.

Inside the mine visitors will find examples of how the miners worked.

Mineral masses can be seen in the mine within the wall areas.

Mineral masses can be seen in the mine within the wall areas.

Mine rail tracks and a spilt in the tunnels.

Mine rail tracks and a spilt in the tunnels.

This part of the mine has examples of the different methods used for proping up the walls of the mine.

This part of the mine has examples of the different methods used for propping up the walls of the mine.

A sign of the air drills that were used to dig the rock away.

A sign of the air drills that were used to dig the rock away.

A mock up of how dynamite was used to blast rock.

A mock-up of how dynamite was used to blast rock

Mine props made of wood.

Mine props made of wood.

The mines had to be ventelated. Here is a vent shaft.

The mines had to be ventilated. Here is a vent shaft.

A working air compressor drill is set up that is switched on for visitors to understand how it worked.

A working air compressor drill is set up that is switched on for visitors to understand how it worked.

Outside

Once the tour inside the mine is complete visitors are able to visit the amphitheater and also the village is close which gives an important context to the area.

The exit to the mine.

The exit to the mine.

The mine is located very close to the village and was the reason the village existed.

The mine is located very close to the village and was the reason the village existed.

Mining tools outside the mine.

Mining tools outside the mine.

The Pit Head Of Ravi  Marchi 

A few km down the road in the village of Ravi are the remains and pit-head towers with lift gear, which are also open to visitors on specific tours.  We looked around the workings and got a look close up at how the above-ground part of a mine functions.

Map

 

Ravi contains pit head gear and was the entrance to another part of the mine complex.

Ravi contains pithead gear and was the entrance to another part of the mine complex.

Ravi Marchi Mine pit head.

Ravi Marchi Mine pit head.

Further information 

Prices and opening times vary through the year, check for the latest
information.

Visit – Only Guided Tours.

Museum and tunnels Plus Ravi Marchi

Adults € 8,00

Reduced € 4,00 (famiglie e gruppi – under 12 – over 65 – scuole)

If you want to know more and find out in more
detail about the group visits that are possible and other information, then visit the website from the visitor center.

http://www.parcominerario.it/

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